Does Homeowners Insurance Cover Appliances?

Homeowners in Tampa can purchase insurance policies to cover damages to their houses, other structures on their properties and belongings inside the home. Homeowners insurance can recoup a homeowner’s property damage repairs or lost property replacements after disasters such as fires, storms, floods or theft. Most homeowners insurance policies cover appliances as well as items such as furniture, electronics and jewelry. Eligibility for coverage, however, depends on specifics such as how the policyholder lost the items and types of coverage the policyholder has purchased.

When Does Homeowners Insurance Cover Appliances?

Most homeowners insurance policies cover appliances in specific circumstances, but not in others. If the homeowner brought his or her coffeemaker to a hotel and accidentally left it there, for example, homeowners insurance generally would not cover the costs of a replacement. If a criminal stole the coffeemaker during a burglary, however, the insurance company may reimburse the owner for this loss during the theft. Homeowners insurance will cover most household appliances in covered scenarios.

  • HVAC equipment
  • Refrigerators
  • Washing machines and dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Ovens
  • Plug-in appliances, such as blenders and microwaves

Homeowners insurance in Florida will generally cover household appliances after house fires, explosions, lightning strikes, theft, bad storms, fallen tree limbs, riots, vandalism, floods, and damages due to plumbing or electrical problems. Each policy is unique, but in general, homeowners insurance policies will pay for lost or damaged appliances in these covered scenarios. The policyholder will have to call his or her insurance provider after an incident to find out if the policy covers a specific item after an incident or natural disaster.

When Does Homeowners Insurance Not Cover Appliances?

Most homeowners insurance policies will not cover appliances if the policyholder lost or damaged the item him or herself. If the policyholder is responsible for the loss or breakdown of the appliance, he or she will have to replace the item without insurance coverage. The policyholder may need to prove that he or she lost the item through a covered event during an insurance claim. Evidence in the form of a police report or photos of storm damage could be enough to fulfill this burden of proof.

The insurance policy also will not cover appliances if the event is not one listed as a covered peril on the plan. Events such as specific natural disasters in the homeowner’s region may lead to zero coverage for lost or damaged belongings if the insurer requires separate insurance for these losses. Finally, the insurance company will typically not cover cosmetic damages to appliances, even if the event that caused the damage was a covered peril. Cosmetic damage such as dents and scratches may not be enough to qualify for insurance benefits.

If your insurance policy is slated to cover certain appliances and is acting in bad faith, our Tampa insurance dispute lawyer can help.

Types of Coverage

The type of homeowners insurance coverage that applies to appliances is personal property insurance. This insurance will cover all home appliances, up to the policy’s maximum. An insurance company may refuse coverage for claims involving appliance breakdowns unless the policyholder has purchased specific coverage for this type of issue.

If an appliance stops functioning due to lack of maintenance, old age, or wear and tear, most homeowners insurance companies will not offer any monetary compensation. If, however, the appliance stops working as a result of a covered event such as a flood, the insurance company will cover damages. Most policies also exclude preventable accidents that damage appliances, such as a child putting sticky putty in a DVD player.

Are Appliances Considered Personal Property in Homeowners Insurance?

Yes, personal property coverage under a typical homeowners insurance plan also covers appliances within a home. A homeowners insurance plan will generally replace damaged or stolen appliances based on the item’s actual cash value at the time of the event, taking depreciation from the date of purchase into account.

If the homeowner did not purchase enough coverage for high-value appliances, he or she may not receive enough from the insurance company to replace the item. A workaround for this issue is to purchase scheduled personal property insurance. This is additional coverage for expensive belongings. A homeowner should discuss his or her plan with an insurance agent for answers to specific coverage questions.